English Muffins!


More bread!  Also, two posts in a week!  Also also, english muffins are very photogenic.

I got the idea to make english muffins from my favorite bread book that I posted about yesterday.  The recipe in the book called for fresh yeast and different kinds of flour that I didn’t have so I went online looking for a different recipe.  I found one on a flour company’s website and decide to use it to make these muffins. They were so much fun to make and were very delicious as well.  I had one (or two…or three….) yesterday and another for breakfast this morning.  They toasted well and were perfect with jam and peanut butter.

Ingredients:

3/4 cup lukewarm milk (nonfat)

1/2 large egg, lightly beaten (more on this below)

1 tbsp butter

2 cups of all purpose flour (plus extra for

1/2 tsp salt

1 tsp instant yeast

yellow cornmeal, not in dough only for sprinkling

Active time: 30 minutes

Inactive time: 2 hours

Servings:  Makes about 15-3″ english muffins

Cooking instructions:

Place all the ingredients (except the cornmeal)  in the bread machine following the instructions specific to your machine.  As I’ve said before, mine says to put in the wet ingredients followed by the dry ingredients, but machines vary.  If your machine is like mine you can just put the ingredients in the order I’ve listed the above.  I had some issues getting just 1/2 of the beaten egg so I ended up adding a little extra egg.  My dough ended up being very sticky so I added about 1/2 cup of flour.  I’m not sure if this is just because I failed at using 1/2 and egg or if this is a common problem. Set the machine to dough and let it run its course.

Once the cycle is complete, remove the dough on a surface sprinkled with cornmeal.  Roll the dough out until it is about 1/2″ thick.  Imperfection is fine, but the different thicknesses will cook slightly different so just be aware.  Cut the dough using a 3″ circle.  I don’t have cookie cutters (no idea why) so I ended up using a brandy sniffer.  It worked pretty well.  Reroll the remaining dough and cut again.  Cover the muffins with a damp paper towel and allow to rise for about 20 more minutes.

Heat a griddle to a low-medium heat.  Sprinkle cornmeal on the griddle. Place the muffins on the griddle cornmeal side down.   Each side should take about 3 minutes to brown.  If your muffins are browning too fast or too slowly, adjust the heat as necessary.  Once both sides are browned, remove the muffin and allow to cool (if you can!) on a wire rack.

To get the “nooks and crannies” that are in classic english muffins, just cut the edge of the muffin with a serrated knife and tear the muffin open with your fingers.  Spread on whatever topping you want or eat plain. And don’t forget to go for second helpings!

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About Holly

I just graduated from the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, WA. Being the indecisive person I am, I decided to take a year off before going to graduate school (there are too many things I want to study). Now I'm in Phoenix taking school pictures and trying my hand at cooking. So far, it's pretty tasty.

Posted on December 7, 2011, in Bread/Baking, Breakfast, Recipe and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 12 Comments.

  1. Welcome to everyone from FoodGawker. Feel free to leave a comment with feedback. I always love to get new suggestions for food or photography. Thank you for visiting!

  2. the muffins look so good!

  3. I love english muffins, but have found it difficult or impossible to buy decent ones, maybe I should make these too, thanks.

  4. I am obsessed with homemade english muffins but haven’t tried to make them yet. I buy them at a local bakery. Now I will have to give it a shot. Thanks for sharing!

  5. Wow you made your own English muffins!! That’s so fantastic, they look gorgeous and just like the best English muffins I’ve ever eaten!
    I would love to try this sometime, definitely bookmarking this for the future 🙂

  6. YUM! I am loving this bread kick of yours. Take that, pasta 🙂

  1. Pingback: breads, rolls, biscuits by cmccown - Pearltrees

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